Celebrating Ourselves, Our way.

Approved outfit selections as submitted to BET prior to the show.
"What Really Happened to Me at the BET Awards"-B.Scott’s Official Open Letter
BET reached out to me to be the Style Stage Correspondent for the 2013 BET Awards 106 and Park Pre-Show. I’ve previously appeared on BET’s 106 and Park twice. On both occasions, there was never an issue with my appearance or how I chose to express myself. Ever.
The powers at be for this show wanted “B. Scott”…but not really. From the beginning, I wanted to make this work. I even tried to secure Chris Brown’s stylist to help me in putting together an appropriate ensemble. Unfortunately BET couldn’t afford him and instead sent over their own stylists to work with me.
After a few weeks of sending over mood boards and going over approved looks, we decided on a few options. All of which were generally more masculine than what I would wear if I were able to decide on my own. Blazers, long sleeved dress shirts, black pants, loafers.
We didn’t know at the time that Los Angeles would be in the middle of a record heat wave, and the options we selected just weren’t weather appropriate. The day before the show I spoke with BET’s style team and we agreed that it was okay to have a more weather appropriate ensemble option.
Not only was it agreed upon among the stylists, I met with a producer of the show the night before and showed her the ensemble. She said it was acceptable and requested I send over a picture so that she could forward it to whomever she needed to. The picture of the complete outfit was sent over and everything was fine. At all points during this process, everything I was going to wear or considering wearing was both discussed and approved. According to BET, everything had to be approved because I was hosting sponsored segments and the sponsors needed to be comfortable.
The morning of the show I arrived on set at 10am for rehearsals. During rehearsals I sent the new outfit over to wardrobe to be steamed. Everybody involved in the process knew what I was wearing and began preparing the pieces accordingly.
As I was getting ready (hair, makeup, wardrobe), various members of the production team were in and out of my trailer making sure I had everything I needed. A producer visited my trailer as I was getting my makeup done. Another producer was there when I was getting my hair straightened. They were even there outside waiting as I was putting on the finishing touches of my outfit.
After rushing to make it to the red carpet in time, I was escorted by several members of production down to the stage. Everybody I spoke with commented on how fabulous I looked. There was never any indication that there was an issue. There was no pushback. I was simply there to do my job.
After interviewing AJ Calloway for my first segment I was literally yanked backstage and told that my look from head to toe “wasn’t acceptable.”
They asked me to pull my hair back, they asked me to change my attire.
Let’s be clear, I wasn’t wearing a ball gown and stiletto heels. I was wearing long pants, and a long shirt.
I was returned to my trailer and forced to change into one of the other outfits while other producers waited outside. I changed quickly and returned to set, only to be told that I had been replaced by Adrienne Bailon and wouldn’t be going on at all.
I was hurt. I am hurt.
A consultant from Procter & Gamble (the company who sponsored the BET Style Stage) watched the entire incident play out. She came over and offered her words of support and encouragement. Her words, ‘We at Procter & Gamble support you and we do not agree with what BET is doing to you’ were extremely comforting. She also explained to me that someone made the call to have me pulled, and that it was the wrong call.
After all, the sponsor approved B. Scott and were expecting B. Scott from the beginning.
I’m not sure what happened, but there were some internal phone calls made and as a result I was added back to the show.
I feel as though at the last minute that someone at BET wasn’t comfortable with someone like me.
It’s not just about the fact that BET forced me to pull my hair back, asked me to take off my makeup, made me changed my clothes and prevented me from wearing a heel. It’s more so that from the mentality and environment created by BET made me feel less than and that something was wrong with who I am as a person.
I want to thank everybody at BET who supported me and fought for me to be on this red carpet.
Thank you to all of my love muffins who have shown support in various ways.
I initially didn’t want to talk about this situation because I was truly embarrassed. But, I feel that it’s important to know that no matter how you choose to express yourself, it is okay to be who you are.

Approved outfit selections as submitted to BET prior to the show.

"What Really Happened to Me at the BET Awards"-B.Scott’s Official Open Letter

BET reached out to me to be the Style Stage Correspondent for the 2013 BET Awards 106 and Park Pre-Show. I’ve previously appeared on BET’s 106 and Park twice. On both occasions, there was never an issue with my appearance or how I chose to express myself. Ever.

The powers at be for this show wanted “B. Scott”…but not really. From the beginning, I wanted to make this work. I even tried to secure Chris Brown’s stylist to help me in putting together an appropriate ensemble. Unfortunately BET couldn’t afford him and instead sent over their own stylists to work with me.

After a few weeks of sending over mood boards and going over approved looks, we decided on a few options. All of which were generally more masculine than what I would wear if I were able to decide on my own. Blazers, long sleeved dress shirts, black pants, loafers.

We didn’t know at the time that Los Angeles would be in the middle of a record heat wave, and the options we selected just weren’t weather appropriate. The day before the show I spoke with BET’s style team and we agreed that it was okay to have a more weather appropriate ensemble option.

Not only was it agreed upon among the stylists, I met with a producer of the show the night before and showed her the ensemble. She said it was acceptable and requested I send over a picture so that she could forward it to whomever she needed to. The picture of the complete outfit was sent over and everything was fine. At all points during this process, everything I was going to wear or considering wearing was both discussed and approved. According to BET, everything had to be approved because I was hosting sponsored segments and the sponsors needed to be comfortable.

The morning of the show I arrived on set at 10am for rehearsals. During rehearsals I sent the new outfit over to wardrobe to be steamed. Everybody involved in the process knew what I was wearing and began preparing the pieces accordingly.

As I was getting ready (hair, makeup, wardrobe), various members of the production team were in and out of my trailer making sure I had everything I needed. A producer visited my trailer as I was getting my makeup done. Another producer was there when I was getting my hair straightened. They were even there outside waiting as I was putting on the finishing touches of my outfit.

After rushing to make it to the red carpet in time, I was escorted by several members of production down to the stage. Everybody I spoke with commented on how fabulous I looked. There was never any indication that there was an issue. There was no pushback. I was simply there to do my job.

After interviewing AJ Calloway for my first segment I was literally yanked backstage and told that my look from head to toe “wasn’t acceptable.”

They asked me to pull my hair back, they asked me to change my attire.

Let’s be clear, I wasn’t wearing a ball gown and stiletto heels. I was wearing long pants, and a long shirt.

I was returned to my trailer and forced to change into one of the other outfits while other producers waited outside. I changed quickly and returned to set, only to be told that I had been replaced by Adrienne Bailon and wouldn’t be going on at all.

I was hurt. I am hurt.

A consultant from Procter & Gamble (the company who sponsored the BET Style Stage) watched the entire incident play out. She came over and offered her words of support and encouragement. Her words, ‘We at Procter & Gamble support you and we do not agree with what BET is doing to you’ were extremely comforting. She also explained to me that someone made the call to have me pulled, and that it was the wrong call.

After all, the sponsor approved B. Scott and were expecting B. Scott from the beginning.

I’m not sure what happened, but there were some internal phone calls made and as a result I was added back to the show.

I feel as though at the last minute that someone at BET wasn’t comfortable with someone like me.

It’s not just about the fact that BET forced me to pull my hair back, asked me to take off my makeup, made me changed my clothes and prevented me from wearing a heel. It’s more so that from the mentality and environment created by BET made me feel less than and that something was wrong with who I am as a person.

I want to thank everybody at BET who supported me and fought for me to be on this red carpet.

Thank you to all of my love muffins who have shown support in various ways.

I initially didn’t want to talk about this situation because I was truly embarrassed. But, I feel that it’s important to know that no matter how you choose to express yourself, it is okay to be who you are.

(Source: lovebscott.com)

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    BET is just a mess for that
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    "What Really Happened to Me at the BET Awards"-B.Scott’s Official Open Letter BET reached out to me to be the Style...
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