Celebrating Ourselves, Our way.

asilisasil:

April Rain Song - Langston Hughes

Life is for the living.
Death is for the dead.
Let life be like music.
And death a note unsaid.

—Langston Hughes

Since Easter is coming up next week, can we trend #TabernacleCouture?

sourcedumal:

sourcedumal:

sourcedumal:

Post your flyest Easter dresses and suits and show off!

On twitter and tumblr and instagram!

Lets do it. 3 days folks

2 days!

Are you a poet? Please submit your poetry for National Poetry Month!

fuckyeahlgbtqblackpeople:

We would love to showcase your poetry at Fuck Yeah LGBTQ Black People! Please submit so we can share with our community here. We look forward to it! 

bookishboi:

strugglingtobeheard:

blackboybe:

Cece & I are cute as hell. The end.

omg awesome!!!! that must have been sweet =D

For those of you who may not know, BlackBoyBe facilitated a panel a few days ago called Talking Gender, Being Gendered: What Can Be Learned from the Transgender Community featuring all Black trans* identified people (CeCe herself included). 
It was amazing! 

bookishboi:

strugglingtobeheard:

blackboybe:

Cece & I are cute as hell. The end.

omg awesome!!!! that must have been sweet =D

For those of you who may not know, BlackBoyBe facilitated a panel a few days ago called Talking Gender, Being Gendered: What Can Be Learned from the Transgender Community featuring all Black trans* identified people (CeCe herself included). 

It was amazing! 

alloutorg:

Meet Aderonke. Before fleeing to the UK, her family was killed and she was arrested and sentenced to death in Nigeria - all because she’s a lesbian.
Now, she might get deported back to danger. Please sign and share urgently - we can stop the UK’s unfair #LGBT deportations:
www.allout.org/aderonke

alloutorg:

Meet Aderonke. Before fleeing to the UK, her family was killed and she was arrested and sentenced to death in Nigeria - all because she’s a lesbian.

Now, she might get deported back to danger. Please sign and share urgently - we can stop the UK’s unfair #LGBT deportations:

www.allout.org/aderonke

ralewis:

Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and columnist. He was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form jazz poetry.
On Civil Rights
“I, too, sing America.I am the darker brother.They send me to eat in the kitchenWhen company comes,But I laugh,And eat well,And grow strong.Tomorrow,I’ll be at the tableWhen company comes.Nobody’ll dareSay to me,"Eat in the kitchen,"Then.Besides,They’ll see how beautiful I amAnd be ashamed—I, too, am America.” 

ralewis:

Langston Hughes was an American poet, social activist, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and columnist. He was one of the earliest innovators of the then-new literary art form jazz poetry.

On Civil Rights

“I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
"Eat in the kitchen,"
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed—

I, too, am America.” 

didierleclair:

Democracy will not comeToday, this yearNor everThrough compromise and fear.
I have as much rightAs the other fellow hasTo standOn my two feetAnd own the land.
I tire so of hearing people say,Let things take their course.Tomorrow is another day.I do not need my freedom when I’m dead.I cannot live on tomorrow’s bread.
FreedomIs a strong seedPlantedIn a great need.
I live here, too.I want freedomJust as you.
LANGSTON HUGHES, Democracy, 1949

didierleclair:

Democracy will not come
Today, this year
Nor ever
Through compromise and fear.

I have as much right
As the other fellow has
To stand
On my two feet
And own the land.

I tire so of hearing people say,
Let things take their course.
Tomorrow is another day.
I do not need my freedom when I’m dead.
I cannot live on tomorrow’s bread.

Freedom
Is a strong seed
Planted
In a great need.

I live here, too.
I want freedom
Just as you.

LANGSTON HUGHESDemocracy, 1949

m4m-ethnic-culture:

A Gay Zulu Wedding and the Danger of a Single LGBT African Story

Male and Married: The Gay Zulu Wedding and the Danger of a Single LGBT African Story

In case you missed it, a few weeks ago, two gay black South African men tied the knot at their 200-guest traditional wedding in KwaDukuza, the first of its kind in the old Zulu capital.

Love birds Tshepo Modisane and Thoba Sithole, both proudly Zulu and Tswana, have made their union a part of South Africa’s history by deciding to go public with their gay African traditional wedding ceremony, with a few twists:

In place of the customary lobolo (bride price or dowry), via which the husband customarily offer’s the wife’s family money and/or gifts, they’ve decided to opt for gender parity and, instead,  offer gifts to each of their families in thanks for raising them. They also plan to use the hyphenated version of both their last names, Sithole-Modisane, and are planning to start a family soon using a surrogate (though this report says they’ll be adopting.)

In the video report (below), the couple shares, “It’s against this idea that being gay is unAfrican… Being gay is as African as being black. We are a part of our culture. Thoba is Zulu and I’m Tswana. We’re rooted in our culture and very excited about it.”

On paper, South Africa boasts the friendliest constitution, which protects its lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) citizens from discrimination based on race, gender and sexual orientation. Yet, the country’s struggle to shift cultural attitudes towards acceptance for this marginalized group of people, especially in rural areas and townships, remains.

According to this Human Rights Watch report, “Black lesbians and transgender men in South African townships and rural areas face an overwhelming climate of discrimination and violence despite protections promised them in the country’s constitution.” It’s no wonder, then, that the mere optics of the “first gay traditional African wedding,” warrant its celebration as a historical milestone for gay Africans everywhere.

Denis Nzioka, founder and editor of Identity Kenya, a news organization covering sexual and gender minorities in Kenya, remarked in an interview, “The gay Zulu wedding was epic, if not pioneering. Having seen the video and photos and customs I was amazed at how the two mixed their love and celebrated it in an ‘African’ way.” And in response to what’s become a slogan amongst anti-gay African leaders, “Homophobia is unAfrican,” Nzioka insists that “the fact that two African men can fall in love and wed, despite a homophobic society that frowns on same-sex relationships counters what many Africans [have been] saying’.”

m4m-ethnic-culture.tumblr.com/archive

The video of the wedding can be viewed here. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ZLB9Y7lPw8

chewdisco:

Hey!  Quick social networking survey for African-identifying Gay, Bisexual Men and MSM (men who have sex with men) based in the UK.  If it applies to you and you have five minutes, please fill it in and share!!  Thanks! xx